VPLEX Health Check

This is a brief post to share the CLI commands and sample output for a quick VPLEX health check.  Our VPLEX had a dial home event and below are the commands that EMC ran to verify that it was healthy.  Here is the dial home event that was generated:

SymptomCode: 0x8a266032
SymptomCode: 0x8a34601a
Category: Status
Severity: Error
Status: Failed
Component: CLUSTER
ComponentID: director-1-1-A
SubComponent: stdf
CallHome: Yes
FirstTime: 2014-11-14T11:20:11.008Z
LastTime: 2014-11-14T11:20:11.008Z
CDATA: Compare and Write cache transaction submit failed, status 1 [Versions:MS{D30.60.0.3.0, D30.0.0.112, D30.60.0.3}, Director{6.1.202.1.0}, ClusterWitnessServer{unknown}] RCA: The attempt to start a cache transaction for a Scsi Compare and Write command failed. Remedy: Contact EMC Customer Support.

Description: The processing of a Scsi Com pare and Write command could not complete.
ClusterID: cluster-1

Based on that error the commands below were run to make sure the cluster was healthy.

This is the general health check command:

VPlexcli:/> health-check
 Product Version: 5.3.0.00.00.10
 Product Type: Local
 Hardware Type: VS2
 Cluster Size: 2 engines
 Cluster TLA:
 cluster-1: FNM00141800023
 
 Clusters:
 ---------
 Cluster Cluster Oper Health Connected Expelled Local-com
 Name ID State State
 --------- ------- ----- ------ --------- -------- ---------
 cluster-1 1 ok ok True False ok
 
 Meta Data:
 ----------
 Cluster Volume Volume Oper Health Active
 Name Name Type State State
 --------- ------------------------------- ----------- ----- ------ ------
 cluster-1 c1_meta_backup_2014Nov21_100107 meta-volume ok ok False
 cluster-1 c1_meta_backup_2014Nov20_100107 meta-volume ok ok False
 cluster-1 c1_meta meta-volume ok ok True
 
 Director Firmware Uptime:
 -------------------------
 Director Firmware Uptime
 -------------- ------------------------------------------
 director-1-1-A 147 days, 16 hours, 15 minutes, 29 seconds
 director-1-1-B 147 days, 15 hours, 58 minutes, 3 seconds
 director-1-2-A 147 days, 15 hours, 52 minutes, 15 seconds
 director-1-2-B 147 days, 15 hours, 53 minutes, 37 seconds
 
 Director OS Uptime:
 -------------------
 Director OS Uptime
 -------------- ---------------------------
 director-1-1-A 12:49pm up 147 days 16:09
 director-1-1-B 12:49pm up 147 days 16:09
 director-1-2-A 12:49pm up 147 days 16:09
 director-1-2-B 12:49pm up 147 days 16:09
 
 Inter-director Management Connectivity:
 ---------------------------------------
 Director Checking Connectivity
 Enabled
 -------------- -------- ------------
 director-1-1-A Yes Healthy
 director-1-1-B Yes Healthy
 director-1-2-A Yes Healthy
 director-1-2-B Yes Healthy
 
 Front End:
 ----------
 Cluster Total Unhealthy Total Total Total Total
 Name Storage Storage Registered Ports Exported ITLs
 Views Views Initiators Volumes
 --------- ------- --------- ---------- ----- -------- -----
 cluster-1 56 0 299 16 353 9802
 
 Storage:
 --------
 Cluster Total Unhealthy Total Unhealthy Total Unhealthy No Not visible With
 Name Storage Storage Virtual Virtual Dist Dist Dual from Unsupported
 Volumes Volumes Volumes Volumes Devs Devs Paths All Dirs # of Paths
 --------- ------- --------- ------- --------- ----- --------- ----- ----------- -----------
 cluster-1 203 0 199 0 0 0 0 0 0
 
 Consistency Groups:
 -------------------
 Cluster Total Unhealthy Total Unhealthy
 Name Synchronous Synchronous Asynchronous Asynchronous
 Groups Groups Groups Groups
 --------- ----------- ----------- ------------ ------------
 cluster-1 0 0 0 0
 
 Cluster Witness:
 ----------------
 Cluster Witness is not configured

This command checks the status of the cluster:

VPlexcli:/> cluster status
Cluster cluster-1
operational-status: ok
transitioning-indications:
transitioning-progress:
health-state: ok
health-indications:
local-com: ok

This command checks the state of the storage volumes:

VPlexcli:/> storage-volume summary
Storage-Volume Summary (no tier)
---------------------- --------------------

Health out-of-date 0
storage-volumes 203
unhealthy 0

Vendor DGC 203

Use meta-data 4
used 199

Capacity total 310T

Matching LUNs and UIDs when presenting VPLEX LUNs to Unix hosts

Our naming convention for LUNs includes the pool ID, LUN number, server name, filesystem/drive letter, last four digits of the array’s serial number, and size (in GB). Having all of this information in the LUN name makes for very easy reporting and identification of LUNs on a server.  This is what our LUN names look like: P1_LUN100_SPA_0000_servername_filesystem_150G

Typically, when presenting a new LUN to our AIX administration team for a new server build, they would assign the LUNs to specific volume groups based on the LUN names. The command ‘powermt display dev=hdiskpower#’ always includes the name & intended volume group for the LUN, making it easy for our admins to identify a LUN’s purpose.  Now that we are presenting LUNs through our VPlex, when they run a powermt display on the server the UID for the LUN is shown, not the name.  Below is a sample output of what is displayed.

root@VIOserver1:/ # powermt display dev=all
Pseudo name=hdiskpower0
VPLEX ID=FNM00141800023
Logical device ID=6000144000000010704759ADDF2487A6 (this would usually be displayed as a LUN name)
state=alive; policy=ADaptive; queued-IOs=0
==============================================================================
————— Host ————— – Stor – — I/O Path — – Stats —
### HW Path I/O Paths Interf. Mode State Q-IOs Errors
==============================================================================
1 fscsi1 hdisk8 CL1-0B active alive 0 0
1 fscsi1 hdisk6 CL1-0F active alive 0 0
0 fscsi0 hdisk4 CL1-0D active alive 0 0
0 fscsi0 hdisk2 CL1-07 active alive 0 0

Pseudo name=hdiskpower1
VPLEX ID=FNM00141800023
Logical device ID=6000144000000010704759ADDF2487A1 (this would usually be displayed as a LUN name)
state=alive; policy=ADaptive; queued-IOs=0
==============================================================================
————— Host ————— – Stor – — I/O Path — – Stats —
### HW Path I/O Paths Interf. Mode State Q-IOs Errors
==============================================================================
1 fscsi1 hdisk9 CL1-0B active alive 0 0
1 fscsi1 hdisk7 CL1-0F active alive 0 0
0 fscsi0 hdisk5 CL1-0D active alive 0 0
0 fscsi0 hdisk3 CL1-07 active alive 0 0

In order to easily match up the UIDs with the LUN names on the server, an extra step needs to be taken on the VPlex CLI. Log in to the VPlex using a terminal emulator, and once you’re logged in use the ‘vplexcli’ command. That will take you to a shell that allows for additional commands to be entered.

login as: admin
Using keyboard-interactive authentication.
Password:
Last login: Fri Sep 19 13:35:28 2014 from 10.16.4.128
admin@service:~> vplexcli
Trying ::1…
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is ‘^]’.

Enter User Name: admin

Password:

VPlexcli:/>

Once you’re in, run the ls -t command with the additional options listed below. You will need to substitute the STORAGE_VIEW_NAME with the actual name of the storage view that you want a list of LUNs from.

VPlexcli:/> ls -t /clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/STORAGE_VIEW_NAME::virtual-volumes

The output looks like this:

/clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/st1pvio12a-b:
Name Value
————— ————————————————————————————————–
virtual-volumes [(0,P1_LUN411_7872_SPB_VIOServer1_VIO_10G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf2487a6,10G),
(1,P0_LUN111_7872_SPA_VIOServer1_VIO_10G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf2487a1,10G)]

Now you can easily see which disk UID is tied to which LUN name.

If you would like to get a list of every storage view and every LUN:UID mapping, you can substitute the storage view name with an asterisk (*).

VPlexcli:/> ls -t /clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/*::virtual-volumes

The resulting report will show a complete list of LUNs, grouped by storage view:

/clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/VIOServer1:
Name Value
————— ————————————————————————————————–
virtual-volumes [(0,P1_LUN421_9322_SPB_/clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/ VIOServer2:
Name Value
————— ————————————————————————————————–
virtual-volumes [(0,P1_LUN421_9322_SPB_VIOServer2_root_75G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248ad9,75G),
(1,R2_LUN125_9322_SPB_VIOServer2_redo2_12G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248b09,12G),
(2,R2_LUN124_9322_SPA_VIOServer2_redo1_12G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248b04,12G),
(3,P3_LUN906_9322_SPB_VIOServer2_oraarc_250G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248aff,250G),
(4,P2_LUN706_9322_SPA_VIOServer2_oraarc_250G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248afa,250G)]

/clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/VIOServer2:
Name Value
————— ————————————————————————————————
virtual-volumes [(1,R2_LUN1025_9322_SPB_VIOServer2_redo2_12G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248b09,12G),
(2,R2_LUN1024_9322_SPA_VIOServer2_redo1_12G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248b04,12G),
(3,P3_LUN906_9322_SPB_VIOServer2_ora1_250G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248aff,250G),
(4,P2_LUN706_9322_SPA_VIOServer2_ora2_250G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248afa,250G)]

/clusters/cluster-1/exports/storage-views/VIOServer3:
Name Value
————— ————————————————————————————————
virtual-volumes [(0,P0_LUN101_3432_SPA_VIOServer3_root_75G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248a0a,75G),
(1,P0_LUN130_3432_SPA_VIOServer3_redo1_25G,VPD83T3:6000144000000010704759addf248a0f,25G),

Our VPlex has only been installed for a few months and our team is still learning.  There may be a better way to do this, but it’s all I’ve been able to figure out so far.

The steps for NFS exporting a file system on a VDM

I made a blog post back in January 2014 about creating an NFS export on a virtual data mover but I didn’t give much detail on the commands you need to use to actually do it. As I pointed out back then, you can’t NFS export a VDM file system from within Unisphere however when a file system is mounted on a VDM its path from the root of the physical Data Mover can be exported from the CLI.

The first thing that needs to be done is determining the physical Data Mover where the VDM resides.

Below is the command you’d use to make that determination:

[nasadmin@Celerra_hostname]$ nas_server -i -v name_of_your_vdm | grep server
server = server_4

That will show you just the physical data mover that it’s mounted on. Without the grep statement, you’d get the output below. If you have hundreds of filesystems it will cause the screen to scroll the info you’re looking for off the top of the screen. Using grep is more efficient.

[nasadmin@Celerra_hostname]$ nas_server -i -v name_of_your_vdm
id = 1
name = name_of_your_vdm
acl = 0
type = vdm
server = server_4
rootfs = root_fs_vdm_name_of_your_vdm
I18N mode = UNICODE
mountedfs = fs1,fs2,fs3,fs4,fs5,fs6,fs7,fs8,…
member_of =
status :
defined = enabled
actual = loaded, active
Interfaces to services mapping:
interface=10-3-20-167 :cifs
interface=10-3-20-130 :cifs
interface=10-3-20-131 :cifs

Next you need to determine the file system path from the root of the Data Mover. This can be done with the server_mount command. As in the prior step, it’s more efficient if you grep for the name of the file system. You can run it without the grep command, but it could generate multiple screens of output depending on the number of file systems you have.

[nasadmin@stlpemccs04a /]$ server_mount server_4 | grep Filesystem_03
Filesystem_03 on /root_vdm_3/Filesystem_03 uxfs,perm,rw

The final step is to actually export the file system using this path from the prior step. The file system must be exported from the root of the Data Mover rather than the VDM. Note that once you have exported the VDM file system from the CLI, you can then manage it from within Unisphere if you’d like to set server permissions. The “-option anon=0,access=server_name,root=server_name” portion of the CLI command below can be left off if you’d prefer to use the GUI for that.

[nasadmin@Celerra_hostname]$ server_export server_4 -Protocol nfs -option anon=0,access=server_name,root=server_name /root_vdm_3/Filesystem_03
server_4 : done

At this point the client can mount the path with NFS.

Dynamic allocation pool limit has been reached

We were having issues with our backup jobs failing on CIFS share backups using Symantec Netbackup.  The jobs died with a “status 24″, which means it was losing communicaiton with the source.  Our backup administrator provided me with the exact times & dates of the failures and I noticed that immediately preceding his failures this error appeared in the server log on the control station:

2012-08-05 07:09:37: KERNEL: 4: 10: Dynamic allocation pool limit has been reached. Limit=0×30000 Current=0×50920 Max=0×0
 

A quick google search came up with this description of the error:  “The maximum amount of memory (number of 8K pages) allowed for dynamic memory allocation has almost been reached. This indicates that a possible memory leak is in progress and the Data Mover may soon panic. If Max=0(zero) then the system forced panic option is disabled. If Max is not zero then the system will force a panic if dynamic memory allocation reaches this level.”

Based on the fact that the error shows up right before a backup failure I saw the correlation.  To fix it, you’lll need to modify the Heap Limit from the default of 0×00030000 to a larger size.  Here is the command to do that:

.server_config server_2 -v “param kernel mallocHeapLimit=0×40000″ (to change the value)
.server_config server_2 -v “param kernel” (will list the kernel parameters).
 

Below is a list of all the kernel parameters:

Name                                                 Location        Current       Default
----                                                 ----------      ----------    ----------
kernel.AutoconfigDriverFirst                         0x0003b52d30    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.BufferCacheHitRatio                           0x0002093108    0x00000050    0x00000050
kernel.MSIXdebug                                     0x0002094714    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MSIXenable                                    0x000209471c    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MSI_NoStop                                    0x0002094710    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MSIenable                                     0x0002094718    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MsiRouting                                    0x0002094724    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.WatchDog                                      0x0003aeb4e0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.autoreboot                                    0x0003a0aefc    0x00000258    0x00000258
kernel.bcmTimeoutFix                                 0x0002179920    0x00000002    0x00000002
kernel.buffersWatermarkPercentage                    0x0003ae964c    0x00000021    0x00000021
kernel.bufreclaim                                    0x0003ae9640    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.canRunRT                                      0x000208f7a0    0xffffffff    0xffffffff
kernel.dumpcompress                                  0x000208f794    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.enableFCFastInit                              0x00022c29d4    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.enableWarmReboot                              0x000217ee68    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.forceWholeTLBflush                            0x00039d0900    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.heapHighWater                                 0x00020930c8    0x00004000    0x00004000
kernel.heapLowWater                                  0x00020930c4    0x00000080    0x00000080
kernel.heapReserve                                   0x00020930c0    0x00022e98    0x00022e98
kernel.highwatermakpercentdirty                      0x00020930e0    0x00000064    0x00000064
kernel.lockstats                                     0x0002093128    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.longLivedChunkSize                            0x0003a23ed0    0x00002710    0x00002710
kernel.lowwatermakpercentdirty                       0x0003ae9654    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.mallocHeapLimit                               0x0003b5558c    0x00040000    0x00030000  (This is the parameter I changed)
kernel.mallocHeapMaxSize                             0x0003b55588    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.maskFcProc                                    0x0002094728    0x00000004    0x00000004
kernel.maxSizeToTryEMM                               0x0003a23f50    0x00000008    0x00000008
kernel.maxStrToBeProc                                0x0003b00f14    0x00000080    0x00000080
kernel.memSearchUsecs                                0x000208fa28    0x000186a0    0x000186a0
kernel.memThrottleMonitor                            0x0002091340    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.outerLoop                                     0x0003a0b508    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.panicOnClockStall                             0x0003a0cf30    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.pciePollingDefault                            0x00020948a0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.percentOfFreeBufsToFreePerIter                0x00020930cc    0x0000000a    0x0000000a
kernel.periodicSyncInterval                          0x00020930e4    0x00000005    0x00000005
kernel.phTimeQuantum                                 0x0003b86e18    0x000003e8    0x000003e8
kernel.priBufCache.ReclaimPolicy                     0x00020930f4    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.priBufCache.UsageThreshold                    0x00020930f0    0x00000032    0x00000032
kernel.protect_zero                                  0x0003aeb4e8    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.remapChunkSize                                0x0003a23fd0    0x00000080    0x00000080
kernel.remapConfig                                   0x000208fe40    0x00000002    0x00000002
kernel.retryTLBflushIPI                              0x00020885b0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.roundRobbin                                   0x0003a0b504    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.setMSRs                                       0x0002088610    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.shutdownWdInterval                            0x0002093238    0x0000000f    0x0000000f
kernel.startAP                                       0x0003aeb4e4    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.startIdleTime                                 0x0003aeb570    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.stream.assert                                 0x0003b00060    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.switchStackOnPanic                            0x000208f8e0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.threads.alertOptions                          0x0003a22bf4    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.threads.maxBlockedTime                        0x000208f948    0x00000168    0x00000168
kernel.threads.minimumAlertBlockedTime               0x000208f94c    0x000000b4    0x000000b4
kernel.threads.panicIfHung                           0x0003a22bf0    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.timerCallbackHistory                          0x000208f780    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.timerCallbackTimeLimitMSec                    0x000208f784    0x00000003    0x00000003
kernel.trackIntrStats                                0x000209021c    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.usePhyDevName                                 0x0002094720    0x00000001    0x00000001

Using the server_stats command on Celerra / VNX File

Server_stats is a CLI based real time performance monitoring tool from EMC for the Celerra and VNX file.  This post is meant to give a quick overview of the server_stats command with some samples on using it in a scheduled cron job. If you’re looking to dive into using the server_stats feature, I’d suggest using the online manual pages (man server_stats) to get a good idea of all the features and reviewing the “Managing Statistics for VNX” Guide from EMC here:  http://corpusweb130.emc.com/upd_prod_VNX/UPDFinalPDF/en/Statistics.pdf.

I don’t personally use it so I can’t explain how to set it up, but there is an opensource tool that you can use to push server_stats data to graphite called vnx2graphite. You can get it here: http://www.findbestopensource.com/product/fatz-vnx2graphite.   You can download Graphite here: http://graphite.wikidot.com/.

Here is the command line syntax:

server_stats <movername>

   -list
| -info [-all|<statpath_name>[,...]]
| -service { -start [-port <port_number>]

| -stop
| -delete
| -status }

 | -monitor -action {status|enable|disable}
|[

[{ -monitor {statpath_name|statgroup_name}[,...]
| -monitor {statpath_name|statgroup_name}
[-sort <field_name>]
[-order {asc|desc}]
[-lines <lines_of_output>]

 }…]
[-count <count>]
[-interval <seconds>]
[-terminationsummary {no|yes|only}]
[-format {text [-titles {never|once|<repeat_frequency>}]|csv}]
[-type {rate|diff|accu}]
[-file <output_filepath> [-overwrite]]
[-noresolve]
]

Here’s an explanation of a few of the useful table options and what to look for:

Syntax:  server_stats server_2 -i <interval in sec> -c <# of counts> -table <stat>

table cifs 

-Look at uSec/call. The output is in microseconds, divide by 1000 to convert to milliseconds. This tells you how long it takes the celerra to perform specific CIFS operations.

table dvol 

-This is for disk stats.  It shows the write distribution across all volumes.  Look for IO balance across resources.

table fsvol 

-Use this to check filesystem IO.  You’ll be able to monitor which file systems are getting all of the IO with this table.

Start with an interval of 1 first to look for spikes or bursts and then increase it incrementally (10 seconds, 30 seconds, 1 minute, 5 minutes, etc). You can also use Celerra monitor to get Clariion stats.  Look at queueing, cache flushes, etc.  Writes should be through to cache on the Clariion, and unless your write cache is filling up they should be faster than reads.

Here are some sample commands and what they do:

server_stats server_2 -table fsvol -interval 1 -count 10

-This correlates the filesystem to the meta-volumes and shows the % contribution of write requests for each meta-volume (FS Write Reqs %).

server_stats server_2 -table net -interval 1 -count 10

-This shows Network in (KiB/s) / Network In (Pkts/s) to figure out the packet size.  Do this for in and for out to verify the standard MTU size.

server_stats server_2 -summary nfs,cifs -interval 1 -count 10

-This will give a summary of performance stats for nfs and cifs.

Here are some additional sample commands, and how you can add to your crontab to automatically collect performance data:

Collect CIFS and NFS data every 5 minutes:

*/5 * * * * /nas/bin/server_stats server_2 -monitor cifs.smb1,cifs.smb2,nfs.v2,nfs.v3,nfs.v4,cifs.global,nfs.basic -format csv -terminationsummary no -i 5 -c 60 -type accu -file “/nas/quota/slot_2/perfstats/data/server_2/server_2_`date ‘+\%FT\%T’|sed s/://g`” > /dev/null

In the command above the -type accu option tells the command to accumulates statistics upon each capture rather than starting back at a baseline of zero. You can also do ‘diff’ to capture the difference from interval to interval.

Collect diskVol performance stats every 5 minutes:

*/5 * * * * /nas/bin/server_stats server_2 -monitor diskVolumes-std -i 5 -c 60 -file “/nas/quota/slot_2/perfstats/data/server_2/server_2_`date ‘+\%FT\%T’|sed s/://g`” > /dev/null

Collect top_talkers data every 5 minutes:

*/5 * * * * /nas/bin/server_stats server_2 -monitor nfs.client -i 5 -c 60 -file “/nas/quota/slot_2/perfstats/data/server_2/server_2_`date ‘+\%FT\%T’|sed s/://g`” > /dev/null

Below are some useful nfs and cifs stats that you can monitor (pulled from DART 8.1.2-51).  For a full list, run the command server_stats server_2 -i.

cifs.global.basic.totalCalls,cifs.global.basic.reads,cifs.global.basic.readBytes,cifs.global.basic.readAvgSize,cifs.global.basic.writes,cifs.global.basic.writeBytes,
cifs.global.basic.writeAvgSize,cifs.global.usage.currentConnections,cifs.global.usage.currentOpenFiles

nfs.basic,nfs.client,nfs.currentThreads,nfs.export,nfs.filesystem,nfs.group,nfs.maxUsedThreads,nfs.totalCalls,nfs.user,nfs.v2,nfs.v3,nfs.v4,nfs.vdm

 

Celerra Disk Provisioning Wizard incorrectly believes there are not enough drives available for provisioning

I recently had an issue attempting to extend our production NAS file pool on our NS-960.  We had just added Six new 2TB SATA disks to the array, and when I launched the Disk Provisioning Wizard it gave me this error:

“The number of drives available for provisioning additional storage are insufficient”.

That of course wasn’t true, as a 4+2 RAID6 config is indeed supported on this platform and I had just added six drives. I did come up with a workaround to do it manually thanks to some helpful advice from our local EMC technical rep.  I manually created a RAID6 Raid Group in a 4+2 config, and then created a single LUN using all of the available space in the Raid Group (about 7337GB).   Once the LUN is created, you can add it to the Celerrra storage group, in my case it was named “Celerra_hostname”.

When adding the LUN to the storage group, there is a critical step that you must not skip.  The HLU number must be modified!  After you click on a LUN, click add, look for it in the list and notice that the far right column shows the HLU (Host LUN ID).  The LUN you just added will have a blank entry.  It doesn’t look like it’s an editable field, but it is – simply click on the blank area where the number should be and you’ll get a drop down box.  The number you chose must be greater than 15.  Once you’ve modified the HLU for the new LUN, then click on OK to complete the process.

Next, you’ll want to switch back over to the Celerra Management interface, click on the ‘Storage’ tab, then click on the ‘Rescan Storage Systems’ link.  You will get a warning message that states:

“Rescan detects newly available storage and storage systems. Do not rescan unless all primary Data Movers are operating normally. The operation might take a few minutes to complete.”  

Heed the warning and make sure your data movers are up and functional.  You can monitor the progress in the background tasks area.   On my first attempt the Rescan failed.  I got this error message:

“Storage API code=3593: SYMAPI_C_CLARIION_LOAD_ERROR.  An error occurred while data was being loaded from a Clariion.” | “No additional information is available” | “No recommended action is available”.

At the point I got that error I was at the end of my work day and decided to get back to it the next day.  I had planned on opening an SR.  When I re-ran the same scan the next day it worked fine and my production pool auto-extended.  Problem solved.

How to reserve a Celerra / VNX NAS share for a single file type or group of file types

Several years ago I posted on Celerra/VNX NAS file extension filtering (see here), but didn’t write about file system reservations for specific file types, which is also possible.  You can set up NAS shares so that only the file types you want stored there can be written to the share.

In order to do this, first navigate to the \\NAS_Server\C$ administrative share and open the “.filefilter” folder.  You’ll then want to create the following filter files to complete the configuration:

allfiles[@<sharename>][@NetBIOS_name] – this filter file prohibits all file types from being created on the share.  File types that you want excluded from this blanket deny are identified by regular filter files.

noext[@<sharename>][@NetBIOS_name] – this filter file prohibits files with no extensions from being created on the share.  It will prevent a user from saving a file with no filename extension.

<extension_name>[@<sharename>][@NetBIOS_name] – this filter file identifies the types of files you want allowed on the share.  You will need to configure the ACLs to identify which users and/or groups can create files on the share.  File types specified by regular filter files like this one are the exceptions to the allfiles restriction.  If you wanted to reserve a share for only outlook files and message files, you could create two filter files, pst[@<sharename>][@NetBIOS_name] and msg[@<sharename>][@NetBIOS_name], then set appropriate permissions.