Category Archives: Celerra / VNX File specific

Scripting a VNX/Celerra to Isilon Data Migration with EMCOPY and Perl

datamigration

Below is a collection of perl scripts that make data migration from VNX/Celerra file systems to an Isilon system much easier.  I’ve already outlined the process of using isi_vol_copy_vnx in a prior post, however using EMCOPY may be more appropriate in a specific use case, or simply more familiar to administrators for support and management of the tool.  Note that while I have tested these scripts in my environment, they may need some modification for your use.  I recommend running them in a test environment prior to using them in production.

EMCOPY can be downloaded directly from DellEMC with the link below.  You will need to be a registered user in order to download it.

https://download.emc.com/downloads/DL14101_EMCOPY_File_migration_tool_4.17.exe

What is EMCOPY?

For those that haven’t used it before, EMCOPY is an application that allows you to copy a file, directory, and subdirectories between NTFS partitions while maintaining security information, an improvement over the similar robocopy tool that many veteran system administrators are familiar with. It allows you to back up the file and directory security ACLs, owner information, and audit information from a source directory to a destination directory.

Notes about using EMCOPY:

1) In my testing, EMCopy has shown up to a 25% performance improvement when copying CIFS data compared to Robocopy while using the same number of threads. I recommend using EMCopy over Robocopy as it has other feature improvements as well, for instance sidmapfile, which allows migrating local user data to Active Directory users. It’s available in version 4.17 or later.  Robocopy is also not an EMC supported tool, while EMCOPY is.

2) Unlike isi_vol_copy_vnx, EMCOPY is a windows application and must be run from a windows host.  I highly recommend a dedicated server for any migration tasks.  The isi_vol_copy_vnx utility runs directly on the Isilon OneFS CLI which eliminates any intermediary copy hosts, theoretically providing a much faster solution.

3) There are multiple methods to compare data sizes between the source and destination. I would recommend maintaining a log of each EMCopy session as that log indicates how much data was copied and if there were any errors.

4) If you are migrating over a WAN connection, I recommend first restoring from tape and then using an incremental data sync with EMCOPY.

Getting Started

I’ve divided this post up into a four step process.  Each step includes the relevant script and a description of the process.

  • Export File System information (export_fs.pl  Script)

Export file system information from the Celerra & generate the Isilon commands to re-create them.

  • Export SMB information (export_smb.pl Script)

Export SMB share information from the Celerra & generate the Isilon commands to re-create them.

  • Export NFS information (export_nfs.pl Script)

Export NFS information from the Celerra & generate the Isilon commands to re-create them.

  • Create the EMCOPY migration script (EMCOPY_create.pl Script)

Perform the data migration with EMCOPY using the output from this script.

Exporting information from the Celerra to run on the Isilon

These Perl scripts are designed to be run directly on the Control Station and will subsequently create shell scripts that will run on the Isilon to assist with the migration.  You will need to manually copy the output files from the VNX/Celerra to the Isilon. The first three steps I’ve outlined do not move the data or permissions, they simply run a nas_fs query on the Celerra to generate the Isilon script files that actually make the directories, create quotas, and create the NFS and SMB shares. They are “scripts that generate scripts”. 🙂

Before you run the scripts, make sure you edit them to correctly specify the appropriate Data Mover.  Once complete, You’ll end up with three .sh files created for you to move to your Isilon cluster.  They should be run in the same order as they were created.

Note that EMC occasionally changes the syntax of certain commands when they update OneFS.  Below is a sample of the isilon specific commands that are generated by the first three scripts.  I’d recommend verifying that the syntax is still correct with your version of OneFS, and then modify the scripts if necessary with the new syntax.  I just ran a quick test with OneFS 8.0.0.2, and the base commands and switches appear to be compatible.

isi quota create –directory –path=”/ifs/data1″ –enforcement –hard-threshold=”1032575M” –container=1
isi smb share create –name=”Data01″ –path=”/ifs/Data01/data”
isi nfs exports create –path=”/Data01/data”  –roclient=”Data” –rwclient=”Data” –rootclient=”Data”

 

Step 1 – Export File system information

This script will generate a list of the file system names from the Celerra and place the appropriate Isilon commands that create the directories and quotes into a file named “create_filesystems_xx.sh”.

#!/usr/bin/perl

# Export_fs.pl – Export File system information
# Export file system information from the Celerra & generate the Isilon commands to re-create them.

use strict;
my $nas_fs="nas_fs -query:inuse=y:type=uxfs:isroot=false -fields:ServersNumeric,Id,Name,SizeValues -format:'%s,%s,%s,%sQQQQQQ'";
my @data;

open (OUTPUT, ">> create_filesystems_$$.sh") || die "cannot open output: $!\n\n";
open (CMD, "$nas_fs |") || die "cannot open $nas_fs: $!\n\n";

while ()

{
   chomp;
   @data = split("QQQQQQ", $_);
}

close(CMD);
foreach (@data)

{
   my ($dm, $id, $dir,$size,$free,$used_per, $inodes) = split(",", $_);
   print OUTPUT "mkdir /ifs/$dir\n";
   print OUTPUT "chmod 755 /ifs/$dir\n";
   print OUTPUT "isi quota create --directory --path=\"/ifs/$dir\" --enforcement --hard-threshold=\"${size}M\" --container=1\n";
}

The Output of the script looks like this (this is an excerpt from the create_filesystems_xx.sh file):

isi quota create --directory --path="/ifs/data1" --enforcement --hard-threshold="1032575M" --container=1
mkdir /ifs/data1
chmod 755 /ifs/data1
isi quota create --directory --path="/ifs/data2" --enforcement --hard-threshold="20104M" --container=1
mkdir /ifs/data2
chmod 755 /ifs/data2
isi quota create --directory --path="/ifs/data3" --enforcement --hard-threshold="100774M" --container=1
mkdir /ifs/data3
chmod 755 /ifs/data3

The output script can now be copied to and run from the Isilon.

Step 2 – Export SMB Information

This script will generate a list of the smb share names from the Celerra and place the appropriate Isilon commands into a file named “create_smb_exports_xx.sh”.

#!/usr/bin/perl

# Export_smb.pl – Export SMB/CIFS information
# Export SMB share information from the Celerra & generate the Isilon commands to re-create them.

use strict;

my $datamover = "server_8";
my $prot = "cifs";:wq!
my $nfs_cli = "server_export $datamover -list -P $prot -v |grep share";

open (OUTPUT, ">> create_smb_exports_$$.sh") || die "cannot open output: $!\n\n";
open (CMD, "$nfs_cli |") || die "cant open $nfs_cli: $!\n\n";

while ()
{
   chomp;
   my (@vars) = split(" ", $_);
   my $path = $vars[2];
   my $name = $vars[1];

   $path =~ s/^"/\"\/ifs/;
   print  OUTPUT "isi smb share create --name=$name --path=$path\n";
}

close(CMD);

The Output of the script looks like this (this is an excerpt from the create_smb_exports_xx.sh file):

isi smb share create --name="Data01" --path="/ifs/Data01/data"
isi smb share create --name="Data02" --path="/ifs/Data02/data"
isi smb share create --name="Data03" --path="/ifs/Data03/data"
isi smb share create --name="Data04" --path="/ifs/Data04/data"
isi smb share create --name="Data05" --path="/ifs/Data05/data"

 The output script can now be copied to and run from the Isilon.

Step 3 – Export NFS Information

This script will generate a list of the NFS export names from the Celerra and place the appropriate Isilon commands into a file named “create_nfs_exports_xx.sh”.

#!/usr/bin/perl

# Export_nfs.pl – Export NFS information
# Export NFS information from the Celerra & generate the Isilon commands to re-create them.

use strict;

my $datamover = "server_8";
my $prot = "nfs";
my $nfs_cli = "server_export $datamover -list -P $prot -v |grep export";

open (OUTPUT, ">> create_nfs_exports_$$.sh") || die "cannot open output: $!\n\n";
open (CMD, "$nfs_cli |") || die "cant open $nfs_cli: $!\n\n";

while ()
{
   chomp;
   my (@vars) = split(" ", $_);
   my $test = @vars;
   my $i=2;
   my ($ro, $rw, $root, $access, $name);
   my $path=$vars[1];

   for ($i; $i < $test; $i++)
   {
      my ($type, $value) = split("=", $vars[$i]);

      if ($type eq "ro") {
         my @tmp = split(":", $value);
         foreach(@tmp) { $ro .= " --roclient=\"$_\""; }
      }
      if ($type eq "rw") {
         my @tmp = split(":", $value);
         foreach(@tmp) { $rw .= " --rwclient=\"$_\""; }
      }

      if ($type eq "root") {
         my @tmp = split(":", $value);
         foreach(@tmp) { $root .= " --rootclient=\"$_\""; }
      }

      if ($type eq "access") {
         my @tmp = split(":", $value);
         foreach(@tmp) { $ro .= " --roclient=\"$_\""; }
      }

      if ($type eq "name") { $name=$value; }
   }
   print OUTPUT "isi nfs exports create --path=$path $ro $rw $root\n";
}

close(CMD);

The Output of the script looks like this (this is an excerpt from the create_nfs_exports_xx.sh file):

isi nfs exports create --path="/Data01/data" --roclient="Data" --roclient="BACKUP" --rwclient="Data" --rwclient="BACKUP" --rootclient="Data" --rootclient="BACKUP"
isi nfs exports create --path="/Data02/data" --roclient="Data" --roclient="BACKUP" --rwclient="Data" --rwclient="BACKUP" --rootclient="Data" --rootclient="BACKUP"
isi nfs exports create --path="/Data03/data" --roclient="Backup" --roclient="Data" --rwclient="Backup" --rwclient="Data" --rootclient="Backup" --rootclient="Data"
isi nfs exports create --path="/Data04/data" --roclient="Backup" --roclient="ProdGroup" --rwclient="Backup" --rwclient="ProdGroup" --rootclient="Backup" --rootclient="ProdGroup"
isi nfs exports create --path="/" --roclient="127.0.0.1" --roclient="127.0.0.1" --roclient="127.0.0.1" -rootclient="127.0.0.1"

The output script can now be copied to and run from the Isilon.

Step 4 – Generate the EMCOPY commands

Now that the scripts have been generated and run on the Isilon, the next step is the actual data migration using EMCOPY.  This script will generate the commands for a migration script, which should be run from a windows server that has access to both the source and destination locations. It should be run after the previous three scripts have successfully completed.

This script will output the commands directly to the screen, it can then be cut and pasted from the screen directly into a windows batch script on your migration server.

#!/usr/bin/perl

# EMCOPY_create.pl – Create the EMCOPY migration script
# Perform the data migration with EMCOPY using the output from this script.

use strict;

my $datamover = "server_4";
my $source = "\\\\celerra_path\\";
my $dest = "\\\\isilon_path\\";
my $prot = "cifs";
my $nfs_cli = "server_export $datamover -list -P $prot -v |grep share";

open (OUTPUT, ">> create_smb_exports_$$.sh") || die "cant open output: $!\n\n";
open (CMD, "$nfs_cli |") || die "cant open $nfs_cli: $!\n\n";

while ()
{
   chomp;
   my (@vars) = split(" ", $_);
   my $path = $vars[2];
   my $name = $vars[1];

   $name =~ s/\"//g;
   $path =~ s/^/\/ifs/;

   my $log = "c:\\" . $name . "";
   $log =~ s/ //;
   my $src = $source . $name;
   my $dst = $dest . $name;

   print "emcopy \"$src\" \"$  dst\" /o /s /d /q /secfix /purge /stream /c /r:1 /w:1 /log:$log\n";
}

close(CMD);

The Output of the script looks like this (this is an excerpt from the screen output):

emcopy "\\celerra_path\Data01" "\\isilon_path\billing_tmip_01" /o /s /d /q /secfix /purge /stream /c /r:1 /w:1 /log:c:\billing_tmip_01
emcopy "\\celerra_path\Data02" "\\isilon_path\billing_trxs_01" /o /s /d /q /secfix /purge /stream /c /r:1 /w:1 /log:c:\billing_trxs_01
emcopy "\\celerra_path\Data03" "\\isilon_path\billing_vru_01" /o /s /d /q /secfix /purge /stream /c /r:1 /w:1 /log:c:\billing_vru_01
emcopy "\\celerra_path\Data04" "\\isilon_path\billing_rpps_01" /o /s /d /q /secfix /purge /stream /c /r:1 /w:1 /log:c:\billing_rpps_01

That’s it.  Good luck with your data migration, and I hope this has been of some assistance.  Special thanks to Mark May and his virtualstoragezone blog, he published the original versions of these scripts here.

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Mutiprotocol VNX File Systems: Listing and counting Shares & Exports by file system

I’m in the early process of planning a NAS data migration from VNX to Isilon, and one of the first steps I wanted to accomplish was to identify which of our VNX file systems are multiprotocol (with both CIFS shares and NFS exports from the same file system). In the environment I support, which has over 10,000 cifs shares, it’s not a trivial task to identify which shares are multiprotocol.  After some research it doesn’t appear that there is a built in method from EMC for determining this information from within the Unisphere GUI. From the CLI, however, the server_export command can be used to view the shares and exports.

Here’s an example of listing shares and exports with the server_export command:

[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$server_export ALL -Protocol cifs -list | grep filesystem01

share "share01$" "/filesystem01/data" umask=022 maxusr=4294967294 netbios=NASSERVER comment="Contact: John Doe"
 
[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$server_export ALL -Protocol nfs -list | grep filesystem01

export "/root_vdm_01/filesystem01/data01" rw=admins:powerusers:produsers:qausers root=storageadmins access=admins:powerusers:produsers:qausers:storageadmins
export "/root_vdm_01/filesystem01/data02" rw=admins:powerusers:produsers:qausers root=storageadmins access=admins:powerusers:produsers:qausers:storageadmins

The output above shows me that the file system named “filesystem01” has one cifs share and two NFS exports.  That’s a good start, but I want to get a count of the number of shares and exports rather than a detailed list of them. I can accomplish that by adding ‘wc’ [word count] to the command:

[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$ server_export ALL -Protocol cifs -list | grep filesystem01 | wc
 1 223 450

[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$ server_export ALL -Protocol nfs -list | grep filesystem01 | wc
 2 15 135

That’s closer to what I want.  The output includes three numbers and the first number is the line count.  I really only want that number, so I’ll just grab it with awk. Ultimately I want the output to go to a single file with each line containing the name of
the file system, the number of CIFS shares, and the number of NFS Exports.  This line of code will give me what I want:

[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$ echo -n "filesystem01",`server_export ALL -Protocol cifs -list | grep filesystem01 | wc | awk '{print $1}'`, `server_export ALL -Protocol nfs -list | grep filesystem01 | wc | awk '{print $1}'` >> multiprotocol.txt ; echo 
" " >> multiprotocol.txt

The output is below.  It’s perfect, as it’s in the format of a comma delimited file and can be easily exported into Microsoft Excel for reporting purposes.

filesystem01, 1, 2

Here’s a more detailed explanation of the command:

echo -n “filesystem01”, : Echo will write the name of the file system to the screen or to a file if you’ve redirected it with “>” at the end of the command.  Adding the “-n” supresses the “new line” that is automatically created after text is outputted, as I want each file system and it’s share & export count to be on the same line in the report.

`server_export ALL -Protocol cifs -list | grep filesystem01 | wc | awk ‘{print $1}’`,: The server_export command lists all of the cifs shares for the file system that you’re grepping for.  The wc command is for the “word count”, we’re using it to count the number of output lines to verify how many exports exist for the specified file system.  The awk ‘{print $1}’ command will output only the first item of data, when it hits a blank space it will stop.  If the output is “1 23 34 32 43 1”, running ‘{print $1}’ will only output the 1.

`server_export ALL -Protocol nfs -list | grep filesystem01 | wc | awk ‘{print $1}’` >> multiprotocol.txt: This is the same command as above, but we’re now counting the number of NFS exports rather than CIFS shares.

; echo ” ” >> multiprotocol.txt:  After the count is complete and the data has been outputted, I want to run an echo command without the “-n” option to force a line break to the next line, in preparation for the next line of the script.  When exporting, using “>” will output the results to a file and overwrite the file if it already exists, if you use “>>”, it will append the results to the file if it already exists.  In this case we want to append each line.  In an actual script you’d want to create a blank file first with “echo > filename.ext”. Also, the “;” prior to the command instructs the interpreter to start a new command regardless of the success or failure of the prior command.

At this point, all that needs to be done is to create a script that includes the line above with every file system on the VNX. I copied the line of code above into excel into multiple columns, allowing me to copy and paste the file system list from Unisphere and then concatenate the results into a single script file. I’m including a screenshot of one of my script lines from Excel as an example.  The final column (AG) has the following formula:

=CONCATENATE(A4,B4,C4,D4,E4,F4,G4,H4,I4,J4,K4,L4,M4,N4,O4,P4,Q4,R4,S4,T4,U4,V4,W4,X4,Y4,Z4,AA4,AB4,AC4,AD4,AE4)

Spreadsheet example:

multiprotocol count

 

VNX NAS Files incorrectly report as Locked for Editing

When opening a shared Microsoft Office file, you may see the error message “File in Use, file_name is locked for editing by user_name“, when in fact no other user is currently using the file.

We had users that would view files with the preview pane, it would create a lock on the file, and then when the explorer window was closed the lock would remain.  The next time the file was accessed it would state that it was locked even though the user didn’t have it open.  Below are some steps you can take to troubleshoot and resolve the issue.  Note that changing some of these parameters can have a performance impact, so make these changes at your own risk.  Oplocks let clients lock files and locally cache information while preventing another user from changing the file. This increases performance for many file operations.

1. Disable Oplocks on the VNX

Disabling oplocks can affect client performance. It will increase the number of metadata requests that are sent to the server because when you use SMB with oplocks, the client caches the data that is locked to speed up access to frequently accessed files. When oplocks are disabled, the client does not cache data and all reads are made directly to the NAS server.

Syntax for disabling oplocks and verifying the change:

[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$ server_mount vdm_file_system -o nooplock test_file_system01_fs /test_file_system01
vdm_file_system : done

[nasadmin@VNX1 ~]$ server_mount vdm_file_system | grep test_file_system01_fs
test_file_system01_fs on /test_file_system01 uxfs,perm,rw,noprefetch,nonotify,accesspolicy=NATIVE,nooplock

2. Disable caching on the Windows client

The Windows client setting controls the cache lifetime. As stated earlier, if caching is disabled on the windows client then all reads are to the NAS server directly. In order to to disable caching on the windows client rather than disabling oplocks on the VNX Data Mover, the following three registry changes would need to be made:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanWorkstation\Parameters\

– Directory cache,  set DirectoryCacheLifetime to Zero.
– File Not Found cache, set FileNotFoundCacheLifetime to Zero.
– File information cache, set FileInfoCacheLifetime to Zero.

3. Apply a Microsoft hotfix

The Microsoft KB article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/942146 describes the problem and the fix in detail.  It directly addresses the issue with files locking from the preview pane.  It applies to all versions of Windows Vista and 7 as well as Windows Server 2008.

Scripting an alert for checking the availability of individual CIFS server shares

It was recently asked to come up with a method to alert on the availability of specific CIFS file shares in our environment.  This was due to a recent issue we had on our VNX with our data mover crashing and causing the corruption of a single file system when it came back up.  We were unaware for several hours of the one file system being unavailable on our CIFS server.

This particular script would require maintenance whenever a new file system share is added to a CIFS server.  A unique line must to be added for every file system share that you have configured.  If a file system is not mounted and the share is inaccessible, an email alert will be sent.  If the share is accessible the script does nothing when run from the scheduler.  If it’s run manually from the CLI, it will echo back to the screen that the path is active.

This is a bash shell script, I run it on a windows server with Cygwin installed using the ‘email’ package for SMTP.  It should also run fine from a linux server, and you could substitute the ‘email’ syntax for sendmail or whatever other mail application you use.   I have it scheduled to check the availability of CIFS shares every one hour.

 

DIR1=file_system_1; SRV1=cifs_servername;  echo -ne $DIR1 && echo -ne “: ” && [ -d //$SRV1/$DIR1 ] && echo “Network Path is Active” || email -b -s “Network Path \\\\$SRV1\\$DIR1 is offline” emailaddress@email.com

DIR2=file_system_2; SRV1=cifs_servername;  echo -ne $DIR1 && echo -ne “: ” && [ -d //$SRV1/$DIR2 ] && echo “Network Path is Active” || email -b -s “Network Path \\\\$SRV1\\$DIR2 is offline” emailaddress@email.com

DIR3=file_system_3; SRV1=cifs_servername;  echo -ne $DIR1 && echo -ne “: ” && [ -d //$SRV1/$DIR3 ] && echo “Network Path is Active” || email -b -s “Network Path \\\\$SRV1\\$DIR3 is offline” emailaddress@email.com

DIR4=file_system_4; SRV1=cifs_servername;  echo -ne $DIR1 && echo -ne “: ” && [ -d //$SRV1/$DIR4 ] && echo “Network Path is Active” || email -b -s “Network Path \\\\$SRV1\\$DIR4 is offline” emailaddress@email.com

DIR5=file_system_5; SRV1=cifs_servername;  echo -ne $DIR1 && echo -ne “: ” && [ -d //$SRV1/$DIR5 ] && echo “Network Path is Active” || email -b -s “Network Path \\\\$SRV1\\$DIR5 is offline” emailaddress@email.com

Rescan Storage System command on Celerra results in conflict:storageID-devID error

I was attempting to extend our main production NAS file pool on our NS-960 and ran into an issue.  I had recently freed up 8 SATA disks from a block pool and was attempting to re-use them and extend a Celerra file pool.  I created a new RAID Group and LUN that used the maximum capacity of the RAID Group.  I then added the LUN to the celerra storage group, making sure to set the HLU to a number greater than 15.  I then changed the setting on our main production file pool to auto-extend, and clicked on the “Rescan Storage Systems” option.  Unfortunately rescanning produced an error every time it was run.  I have done this exact same procedure in the past and it’s worked fine.  Here is the error:

conflict:storageID-devID: disk=17 old:symm=APM00100600999,dev=001F new:symm=APM00100600999,dev=001F addr=c16t1l11

I checked the disks on the Celerra using the nas_disk –l command, and the new disk shows up as “in use” even though the rescan command didn’t properly complete.

[nasadmin@Celerra tools]$ nas_disk -l
id   inuse  sizeMB    storageID-devID      type   name  servers
17    y     7513381   APM00100600999-001F  CLATA  d17   <BLANK>

Once the dvol is presented to Celerra (assuming the rescan goes fine) it should not be inuse until it is assigned to a storage pool and a file system uses it.  In this case that didn’t happen.  If you run /nas/tools/whereisfs (depending on your DART version, it may be “.whereisfs” with the dot) it shows a listing of every file system and which disk and which LUN they reside on.  I verified that the disk was not in use using that command.

In order to be on the safe side, I opened an SR with EMC rather than simply deleting the disk.  They suggested that the NAS database has a corruption. I’m going to have EMC’s Recovery Team check the usage of the diskvol and then delete it and re-add it.  In order to engage the recovery team you need to sign a “Data Deletion Form” absolving EMC of any liability for data loss, which is standard practice when they delete volumes on a customer array.  If there are any further caveats or important things to note after EMC has taken care of this I’ll update this post.

The steps for NFS exporting a file system on a VDM

I made a blog post back in January 2014 about creating an NFS export on a virtual data mover but I didn’t give much detail on the commands you need to use to actually do it. As I pointed out back then, you can’t NFS export a VDM file system from within Unisphere however when a file system is mounted on a VDM its path from the root of the physical Data Mover can be exported from the CLI.

The first thing that needs to be done is determining the physical Data Mover where the VDM resides.

Below is the command you’d use to make that determination:

[nasadmin@Celerra_hostname]$ nas_server -i -v name_of_your_vdm | grep server
server = server_4

That will show you just the physical data mover that it’s mounted on. Without the grep statement, you’d get the output below. If you have hundreds of filesystems it will cause the screen to scroll the info you’re looking for off the top of the screen. Using grep is more efficient.

[nasadmin@Celerra_hostname]$ nas_server -i -v name_of_your_vdm
id = 1
name = name_of_your_vdm
acl = 0
type = vdm
server = server_4
rootfs = root_fs_vdm_name_of_your_vdm
I18N mode = UNICODE
mountedfs = fs1,fs2,fs3,fs4,fs5,fs6,fs7,fs8,…
member_of =
status :
defined = enabled
actual = loaded, active
Interfaces to services mapping:
interface=10-3-20-167 :cifs
interface=10-3-20-130 :cifs
interface=10-3-20-131 :cifs

Next you need to determine the file system path from the root of the Data Mover. This can be done with the server_mount command. As in the prior step, it’s more efficient if you grep for the name of the file system. You can run it without the grep command, but it could generate multiple screens of output depending on the number of file systems you have.

[nasadmin@stlpemccs04a /]$ server_mount server_4 | grep Filesystem_03
Filesystem_03 on /root_vdm_3/Filesystem_03 uxfs,perm,rw

The final step is to actually export the file system using this path from the prior step. The file system must be exported from the root of the Data Mover rather than the VDM. Note that once you have exported the VDM file system from the CLI, you can then manage it from within Unisphere if you’d like to set server permissions. The “-option anon=0,access=server_name,root=server_name” portion of the CLI command below can be left off if you’d prefer to use the GUI for that.

[nasadmin@Celerra_hostname]$ server_export server_4 -Protocol nfs -option anon=0,access=server_name,root=server_name /root_vdm_3/Filesystem_03
server_4 : done

At this point the client can mount the path with NFS.

Dynamic allocation pool limit has been reached

We were having issues with our backup jobs failing on CIFS share backups using Symantec Netbackup.  The jobs died with a “status 24”, which means it was losing communicaiton with the source.  Our backup administrator provided me with the exact times & dates of the failures and I noticed that immediately preceding his failures this error appeared in the server log on the control station:

2012-08-05 07:09:37: KERNEL: 4: 10: Dynamic allocation pool limit has been reached. Limit=0x30000 Current=0x50920 Max=0x0
 

A quick google search came up with this description of the error:  “The maximum amount of memory (number of 8K pages) allowed for dynamic memory allocation has almost been reached. This indicates that a possible memory leak is in progress and the Data Mover may soon panic. If Max=0(zero) then the system forced panic option is disabled. If Max is not zero then the system will force a panic if dynamic memory allocation reaches this level.”

Based on the fact that the error shows up right before a backup failure I saw the correlation.  To fix it, you’lll need to modify the Heap Limit from the default of 0x00030000 to a larger size.  Here is the command to do that:

.server_config server_2 -v “param kernel mallocHeapLimit=0x40000” (to change the value)
.server_config server_2 -v “param kernel” (will list the kernel parameters).
 

Below is a list of all the kernel parameters:

Name                                                 Location        Current       Default
----                                                 ----------      ----------    ----------
kernel.AutoconfigDriverFirst                         0x0003b52d30    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.BufferCacheHitRatio                           0x0002093108    0x00000050    0x00000050
kernel.MSIXdebug                                     0x0002094714    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MSIXenable                                    0x000209471c    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MSI_NoStop                                    0x0002094710    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MSIenable                                     0x0002094718    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.MsiRouting                                    0x0002094724    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.WatchDog                                      0x0003aeb4e0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.autoreboot                                    0x0003a0aefc    0x00000258    0x00000258
kernel.bcmTimeoutFix                                 0x0002179920    0x00000002    0x00000002
kernel.buffersWatermarkPercentage                    0x0003ae964c    0x00000021    0x00000021
kernel.bufreclaim                                    0x0003ae9640    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.canRunRT                                      0x000208f7a0    0xffffffff    0xffffffff
kernel.dumpcompress                                  0x000208f794    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.enableFCFastInit                              0x00022c29d4    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.enableWarmReboot                              0x000217ee68    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.forceWholeTLBflush                            0x00039d0900    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.heapHighWater                                 0x00020930c8    0x00004000    0x00004000
kernel.heapLowWater                                  0x00020930c4    0x00000080    0x00000080
kernel.heapReserve                                   0x00020930c0    0x00022e98    0x00022e98
kernel.highwatermakpercentdirty                      0x00020930e0    0x00000064    0x00000064
kernel.lockstats                                     0x0002093128    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.longLivedChunkSize                            0x0003a23ed0    0x00002710    0x00002710
kernel.lowwatermakpercentdirty                       0x0003ae9654    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.mallocHeapLimit                               0x0003b5558c    0x00040000    0x00030000  (This is the parameter I changed)
kernel.mallocHeapMaxSize                             0x0003b55588    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.maskFcProc                                    0x0002094728    0x00000004    0x00000004
kernel.maxSizeToTryEMM                               0x0003a23f50    0x00000008    0x00000008
kernel.maxStrToBeProc                                0x0003b00f14    0x00000080    0x00000080
kernel.memSearchUsecs                                0x000208fa28    0x000186a0    0x000186a0
kernel.memThrottleMonitor                            0x0002091340    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.outerLoop                                     0x0003a0b508    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.panicOnClockStall                             0x0003a0cf30    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.pciePollingDefault                            0x00020948a0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.percentOfFreeBufsToFreePerIter                0x00020930cc    0x0000000a    0x0000000a
kernel.periodicSyncInterval                          0x00020930e4    0x00000005    0x00000005
kernel.phTimeQuantum                                 0x0003b86e18    0x000003e8    0x000003e8
kernel.priBufCache.ReclaimPolicy                     0x00020930f4    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.priBufCache.UsageThreshold                    0x00020930f0    0x00000032    0x00000032
kernel.protect_zero                                  0x0003aeb4e8    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.remapChunkSize                                0x0003a23fd0    0x00000080    0x00000080
kernel.remapConfig                                   0x000208fe40    0x00000002    0x00000002
kernel.retryTLBflushIPI                              0x00020885b0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.roundRobbin                                   0x0003a0b504    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.setMSRs                                       0x0002088610    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.shutdownWdInterval                            0x0002093238    0x0000000f    0x0000000f
kernel.startAP                                       0x0003aeb4e4    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.startIdleTime                                 0x0003aeb570    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.stream.assert                                 0x0003b00060    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.switchStackOnPanic                            0x000208f8e0    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.threads.alertOptions                          0x0003a22bf4    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.threads.maxBlockedTime                        0x000208f948    0x00000168    0x00000168
kernel.threads.minimumAlertBlockedTime               0x000208f94c    0x000000b4    0x000000b4
kernel.threads.panicIfHung                           0x0003a22bf0    0x00000000    0x00000000
kernel.timerCallbackHistory                          0x000208f780    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.timerCallbackTimeLimitMSec                    0x000208f784    0x00000003    0x00000003
kernel.trackIntrStats                                0x000209021c    0x00000001    0x00000001
kernel.usePhyDevName                                 0x0002094720    0x00000001    0x00000001